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07 May 2024

Compliances For a Private Limited Company in India – Complete Checklist

07 May 2024
Compliances For a Private Limited Company in India - Complete Checklist

What are the Compliances For a Private Limited Company (PLC) in India?

While company registration unlocks a world of possibilities for business in India, it also introduces the essential concept of compliance. In simpler terms, Compliances For a Private Limited Company refers to the company adhering to a set of established rules and regulations. In the context of Indian businesses, this means following the guidelines outlined in the Companies Act, 2013.  This act serves as the backbone for corporate governance, dictating everything from director qualifications and remuneration to the proper conduct of board and shareholder meetings.

One key aspect of compliance involves adhering to the regulations set forth by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs  (MCA).  This applies to all private limited companies, regardless of their size or turnover.  So, whether you’re a startup with a modest capital base or a well-established entity, annual compliance filings like annual returns are mandatory. Managing day-to-day business activities alongside navigating complex corporate laws can feel overwhelming. This article provides a foundational understanding of compliances for private limited companies in India.  

What is a Private Limited Company (PLC)?

A Private Limited Company (PLC) is a legal entity formed to operate a business, offering several key benefits to its founders.  A defining feature is limited liability, which protects shareholders’ personal assets from the company’s debts.  This means if the company encounters financial difficulties, creditors can only go after the company’s holdings, providing a safety net for shareholders.  Another key aspect is ownership structure.  Unlike publicly traded companies, shares in a PLC are not freely available for purchase on the stock market. Instead, ownership is restricted to a select group, typically founders, or private investors. This allows for more control over the company’s direction and decision-making processes, making PLCs suitable for entrepreneurs seeking to maintain a focused ownership structure.  It’s a popular option for startups, family-run businesses, and companies aiming for a more focused ownership structure. 

List of Important Compliances For a Private Limited Company (PLC) in India

While core compliance requirements remain constant for private limited companies (PLCs) in India, deadlines and procedures can evolve. This table summarizes key compliances along with deadlines specifically for 2024:

1) Incorporation Compliances

Incorporation compliances are the legal requirements a company must follow after it’s officially formed. This includes things like holding your first board meeting within 30 days, opening a company bank account, and getting any licenses or permits you need to operate. You’ll also need to appoint key people, keep track of important documents, and follow labor and tax laws. 

Compliance Description Forms Deadline and Penalty
Declaration of Commencement of Business  Since November 2018, companies in India with a share capital need to file a declaration with the Registrar of Companies (ROC) for the receipt of subscription money in the Bank account of the Company upon incorporation  before starting operations or borrowing. Essentially, it acts as a go-ahead signal for the company to officially begin functioning. INC-20A Within 180 days of incorporation.

 

Penalty of Rs. 50,000 for the company & Rs. 1000 per day for the directors for each day of default not exceeding Rs. 100,000/-

Auditor Appointment Getting your finances in order is crucial right from the start for companies in India. Appointing a statutory auditor ensures proper oversight of your company’s financial health.  ADT-1 Filing Within 30 days of incorporation.

 

Penalty of Rs. 25,000/- but which may extend to Rs. 500,000/- for the Company and Rs. 10,000/- but which may extend to Rs. 100,000/- for the Director or officer of the Company who is in default.

Holding First Board Meeting Newly formed PLCs in India have a crucial meeting on their agenda within the first month. This initial board meeting focuses on setting up the company’s financial foundation. Key items on the discussion table include opening a company bank account to deposit the share capital collected from shareholders, PLC’s incorporation certificate, seal, directors’ disclosures, etc. Additionally, the board will address issuing share certificates,  Within 30 days of incorporation.

 

 

Rs. 25,000/- on the officer of the Company whose duty was to give notice for holding such meeting

Company Merchandise All business letters, envelopes, invoices, etc. should have: Full name of PLC, Corporate Identification Number [CIN], Registered office address, Contact details – Telephone number &; Email id As soon as the PLC is incorporated
Labour & Other Laws Obtaining registration under labour laws if applicable and other laws etc.

2) Director KYC & Disclosures

In India, keeping director information current is crucial. Directors must go through a KYC process (Know Your Customer) to verify their identity. Additionally, directors have annual disclosure obligations. They need to declare any directorships, partnerships, or significant shareholdings in other companies, along with details of their close relatives. These measures ensure transparency and accountability within Indian companies.

Compliance Description Forms Deadline and Penalty
KYC Filing for Directors Keeping Director information up-to-date is essential in India. When filing the KYC form (DIR-3 KYC), both email and mobile phone one-time passwords (OTPs) are required for verification. If a Director’s email or phone number changes, they need to re-file the DIR-3 KYC form to update their information. For other changes in Director details, such as address, a different form (DIR-6) needs to be submitted. DIR-3 KYC / Web KYC Before 30th September of every year (Annual)

 

Deactivation of Director Identification Number (DIN)

Disclosure of Directors’ Interest Indian company directors must disclose their financial interests annually. This includes: – Directorships in other companies, bodies corporate, Partnership firms, association of individuals,  MBP-1 Every First Board Meeting of the Financial Year (Annual) and whenever there is any change in the disclosures already made then at the first Board meeting held after such change

 

The Director shall be liable to a penalty of Rs. 100,000/-

Disclosure of Non-Disqualification by Directors Indian company directors must file a “Director Non-Disqualification Disclosure”  DIR-8 At the time of appointment or reappointment 

Rs. 50,000/- on the Company and every officer of the Company who is in default and in case of continuing failure, a further penalty of Rs. 500/- per day during which such failure continues, subject to a maximum of Rs. 300,000/- in case of Company and Rs. 100,000/- in case of an officer who is in default

3) Financial Statements & Filings

Companies in India are required to maintain transparency through financial statements and filings. These statements, typically including a balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement, paint a clear picture of the company’s financial health, performance, and cash flow. They are filed electronically with the Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) within a specific timeframe, usually Seven months after the financial year ends.

Compliance Description Forms Deadline and Penalty
Financial Statements & Audit Report Indian companies are required to file their financial health report with the government within 30 days of holding their annual general meeting (AGM) . This report includes the balance sheet, profit and loss statement, cash flow statement, a director’s report, and an auditor’s report. However, only companies with a paid-up capital of Rs. 5 crore or more or turnover of Rs. 100 crore or more need to file this information electronically in a specific format called XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language). AOC-4 / AOC-4 XBRL Within 30 days of AGM

 

Penalty of Rs. 10,000/- and in case of continuing failure, with a further penalty of Rs. 100/- per day during which such failure continues, subject to a maximum of Rs. 200,000/- on Company and a penalty of Rs. 10,000/- and in case of continuing failure, with a further penalty of Rs. 100/- per day during which such failure continues, subject to a maximum of Rs. 50,000/- on directors and officers of the Company

Annual Return In India, companies file an annual return summarizing their activities for the financial year (April 1st to March 31st). This report details the registered office, principal business activities, particulars of holding, subsidiary and associate Companies, shares, debentures and other securities, shareholding pattern, its members, and debenture-holders, promoters,  Directors, Key Managerial Personnel (KMP), meetings of members or a class thereof, Board, Remuneration details of the Directors and KMP, penalty or punishment imposed on the Company, its directors or officers and details of compounding of offenses, matters relating to certification of compliances  MGT-7 Within 60 days of AGM.

 

Penalty of Rs. 10,000/- on the Company and every officer who is in default and in case of continuing failure, a further penalty of Rs. 100/- per day for each day during which such failure continues subject to a maximum of Rs. 200,000/- on in case of Company and Rs. 50,000/- in case of an officer in default

4) Meetings & Resolutions

Meetings are a cornerstone of corporate governance in India. Companies hold two main types of meetings: board meetings and general meetings. Board meetings, typically attended by directors, address operational issues, strategic planning, and approving financial statements. Resolutions, formal decisions made by vote at these meetings, guide the company’s direction. General meetings, including annual general meetings (AGMs), involve shareholders who vote on resolutions concerning matters like dividend payouts and board member appointments. Proper notice and record-keeping of both meetings and resolutions are crucial for ensuring transparency and legal compliance.

Compliance Description Forms Deadline and Penalty
Board Meetings Board meetings in India are CEO summits. Directors discuss strategy, vote on key decisions, and oversee company management. Regular meetings ensure transparency and guide the company’s direction. Minimum 4 meetings per year with max 120 days gap between meetings

 

Rs. 25,000/- on the officer of the Company whose duty was to give notice for holding such meeting

Notice of AGM In India, convening an annual general meeting (AGM) requires a proper notice sent to all entitled participants. This notice follows strict guidelines set out in Section 101 of the Companies Act, 2013, and further elaborated in Secretarial Standard-II.  This ensures everyone receives timely information about the meeting, allowing them to prepare and participate effectively. 21 clear days before AGM

 

A penalty of upto Rs. 100,000/- and in case of continuing default, with a further fine upto Rs. 5,000/- for every day during which such default continues on the Company and every officer who is in default

Circulation of Financial Statements & Reports -. 21 clear days before AGM
AGM (Annual General Meeting) Annual General Meetings (AGMs) are yearly gatherings mandated by the Indian Companies Act, 2013. Here, shareholders convene to discuss and approve company matters. 

 

AGMs serve a dual purpose:

 

Transparency & Accountability: Financial statements are presented, allowing shareholders to assess the company’s health. They can then vote on proposals like electing directors, appointing auditors, and approving dividend payments.

Shareholder Engagement: This forum provides a platform for shareholders to ask questions, voice concerns, and offer feedback on the company’s performance and direction. This interaction fosters better communication and strengthens corporate governance.

Within 9 months from the first financial year-end

 

Within 6 months from the financial year-end

A penalty of upto Rs. 100,000/- and in case of continuing default, with a further fine upto Rs. 5,000/- for every day during which such default continues on the Company and every officer who is in default

Appointment/Resignation/Change in Designation of Director Director changes in India require specific procedures to ensure transparency and smooth company operation. Any appointment, resignation, or designation change of a director must be filed with the Registrar of Companies (ROC) within 30 days. Additionally, for resignations, a specific notice period must be provided.  DIR-12 Within 30 days of appointment

 

Penalty of Rs. 50,000/- and in case of continuing offense, a further penalty which may extend to Rs. 500/- for each day during which such default continues on every Director.

 

Rs. 50,000/- and in case of continuing offense, a further penalty which may extend to Rs. 500/- for each day during which such default continues subject to a maximum of Rs. 300,000/- on Company.

 

Filing Special Resolutions (Board Report & Annual Accounts) Special resolutions in India hold significant weight when it comes to company decisions. These require a higher approval threshold compared to regular resolutions, typically needing over 75% of voting members in agreement. .  These documents detail the company’s performance, finances, and future direction, providing crucial information for shareholders to make informed decisions on matters like mergers, substantial asset sales, or changes to the company’s capital structure.   MGT-14 Within 30 days of AGM

 

A Penalty of Rs. 10,000/- and in case of continuing failure with a further penalty of Rs. 100/- for each day during which such failure continues subject to a maximum of Rs. 2,00,000/- on the Company. 

 

Penalty of Rs. 10,000/- for each day during which such failure continues subject to a maximum of Rs. 50,000/- on every officer who is in default

5) Tax Compliances

Maintaining tax compliance is essential for private limited companies in India. This involves filing annual income tax returns that reflect the company’s profits and tax liabilities based on its income bracket. Additionally, companies act as tax collectors by deducting tax at source (TDS) on specific payments like salaries or rent, depositing it with the government. Throughout the year, advance tax installments are also expected based on estimated annual income. Finally, companies exceeding a certain turnover threshold undergo mandatory annual tax audits to ensure the accuracy of their financial records and tax calculations. 

Compliance Description Forms Deadline and Penalty
Advance Tax Calculation and Payment To avoid a year-end tax crunch, private limited companies in India pre-pay a portion of their estimated annual tax liability through advance tax installments.  Calculating your advance tax involves estimating your taxable income for the financial year (April 1st to March 31st) and applying the relevant tax rate. Quarterly

 

Missing these deadlines attracts a penalty of 1% monthly interest on the unpaid amount

Income Tax Returns Private limited companies in India are required to file income tax returns every year, ensuring transparency and timely tax contributions. Filing income tax returns accurately reflects the company’s income and allows for proper tax assessment and payment. The deadline for filing these returns typically falls on September 30th of the assessment year (following the financial year ending March 31st)

 

Minimum penalty of Rs. 10,000 to a maximum of Rs. 1,00,000

Tax Audit
(Only if Turnover exceeds Rs. 10 Crore)
This annual audit by a qualified professional ensures the company’s financial records and tax calculations are accurate. By undergoing a tax audit, companies not only fulfill their legal obligation but also gain valuable insights into their financial health and potential tax optimization strategies. Deadline 30th September

Monetary penalties and may also involve delaying processing of the company’s tax return
GST filing (if applicable) Private limited companies in India need to register for Goods and Services Tax (GST) if their annual turnover surpasses Rs. 40 lakh (for goods) or Rs. 20 lakh (for services) in a specific state (certain special category states have a Rs. 10 lakh threshold). Once registered, GST filing becomes mandatory. Monthly Filing (for Turnover exceeding Rs. 1.5 crore)

Quarterly Filing (for Turnover between Rs. 40 lakh and Rs. 1.5 crore)

Penalties apply
TDS/TCS (if any) Private limited companies in India act as tax collection agents for the government through Tax Deducted at Source (TDS) and Tax Collected at Source (TCS) on specific payments they make. This applies when the company makes payments like salaries, rent, or professional fees.Filing TDS/TCS returns becomes mandatory if the company deducts tax during the financial year. These filings detail the deducted tax information, including the payee’s details, the amount deducted, and the nature of the payment.  The deadline for filing TDS/TCS returns depends on the quarter in which the tax was deducted:

 

1st Quarter (April-June): 15th of July

2nd Quarter (July-September): 15th of October

3rd Quarter (October-December): 15th of January

4th Quarter (January-March): 15th of May

6) Other Compliances

There are other compliances involved as per the nature of business you conduct which may apply to the list of compliances.

Compliance Description Forms Deadline and Penalty
Delay in Payment to MSME Vendor Avoiding delayed payments to MSME vendors is a crucial compliance concern for private limited companies in India. The MSMED Act mandates payment within 45 days of accepting goods or services (or 15 days if no written agreement exists). Failing to comply can result in hefty penalties, including compounded monthly interest on the outstanding amount.  This not only impacts your company’s financial standing but also disrupts your supply chain and potentially damages your reputation with smaller vendors. MSME-1 Half-yearly (April-Sep: Oct 1st; Oct-Mar: April 30th)

 

Penalty of Rs. 25,000/- and in case of continuing failure, with a further penalty of Rs. 1,000/- for each day during which such default continues subject to a maximum of Rs. 300,000/- on the Company and every officer in default. 

No filing fee

Return of Deposits For private limited companies in India that accept public deposits, complying with “Return of Deposits” regulations is crucial.  An annual form, DPT-3, needs to be filed with the Registrar of Companies (ROC) by June 30th, detailing all deposit activity for the previous financial year. This includes amounts received, interest paid, and outstanding deposits, along with non-deposit transactions like loans. Filing the DPT-3 ensures transparency and responsible financial management for handling public funds.  DPT-3 Every year on or before 30th June

Penalty of Rs. 5,000/- and in case of continuing failure, a further fine of Rs. 100/- for every day after the first day during which the default continues on the Company and every officer of the Company who is in default.
Active Company Tagging (Companies registered before Dec 31, 2017) Private limited companies registered in India before December 31, 2017, need to be aware of a specific compliance requirement called “Active Company Tagging” (ACT). Introduced in 2019, this is a one-time process to verify the company’s registration details and registered office address.

 

The deadline to file the e-form (INC-22A) for ACT was April 25, 2019. However, companies that missed the deadline can still file it.

INC-22A On or before 25th April 2019 (one-time filing)

Penalty of Rs. 10,000
Significant Beneficial Owner (SBO) Declaration (if applicable) Significant Beneficial Owners (SBOs) – individuals with major control or influence. 

SBOs are obliged to file a declaration with the Company on acquiring any significant beneficial ownership and on receipt of such declaration the Company shall file a return with the Registrar of Companies

 

This transparency strengthens corporate governance and deters malpractice, but failing to comply can result in penalties for both the SBO and the company.

BEN-1 & BEN-2 BEN-1: To be filed with the Company within 30 days of acquiring any significant beneficial ownership or any change therein

 

BEN-2: To be filed with the Registrar of Companies (ROC) Within 30 days from the date of receipt of declaration by SBO in form BEN-1 

 

A penalty of Rs. 50,000/- and in case of continuing failure, then with a further penalty of Rs. 1,000/- for each day during which such failure continues, subject to a maximum of Rs. 200,000/- on the person failing to make a declaration.

 

A Penalty of Rs. 100,000/- and in case of continuing failure, then with a further penalty of Rs. 500/- for each day during which such failure continues, subject to a maximum of Rs. 500,000/- on the Company and a penalty of Rs. 200/- for each day, in case of continuing failure subject to a maximum of Rs. 100,000/- on the officer who is in default.

Appointment of Company Secretary (if applicable) Mandatory Appointment: Companies with a paid-up capital of Rs. 10 crore or more (listed or public).Every Private Limited Companies having paid up share capital of Rs. 10 crore or more must appoint a whole-time company secretary.

 

Board Meeting: Convene a board meeting and pass a resolution appointing a qualified company secretary.

File the requisites form electronically with the Registrar of Companies (ROC) within 30 days of the appointment.

 

Compliance Benefits:  A company secretary plays a crucial role in ensuring good corporate governance, legal compliance, and smooth functioning. They handle tasks like managing board meetings, maintaining statutory records, and filing various legal documents.

DIR-12 Within 30 days of appointment of Company Secretary. 

 

Failure in appointment of a Company Secretary shall make the Company liable to a penalty of Rs. 500,000/- and every director and KMP who is in default shall be liable to a penalty of Rs. 50,000/- and in case of a continuing default, with a further penalty of Rs. 1,000/- for each day during which such default continues but not exceeding Rs. 500,000/-

Maintaining Employee related Compliances like ESI, PF Annual

Annual Compliance Checklist for a Private Limited Company

Below is a summarized Checklist for Annual Compliances of a Private Limited Company (PLC)

  • Filing MSME Form 1 (Due by 30th April for the half year October to March and Due by 31st October for the half year April to September)
  • Filing Return of Deposits (DPT-3) (Due by 30th June of every year)
  • Holding Annual General Meeting (AGM) (Typically within 6 months of financial year-end)
  • Filing Annual Financial Statements (AOC-4) (Due within 30 days of AGM)
  • Filing Annual Return (MGT-7) (Due within 60 days of AGM)
  • Holding Board Meetings during a Financial Year (At Least 4 meetings in a calendar year with a gap of not more than 120 days between 2 meetings)
  • Filing Income Tax Return (ITR) (Due by September 30th as specified by Income Tax Department)
  • Filing Tax Audit Report (if applicable) (Due within specified time frame after tax audit is conducted)
  • Payment of Advance Tax (Quarterly throughout the financial year)
  • Filing GST Returns (if applicable) (Frequency depends on turnover – monthly, quarterly, or annually)
  • Filing TDS/TCS Returns (if applicable) (Quarterly with the Income Tax Department)
  • Renewal of Licenses and Permits
  • Employee-related compliances (ESI & PF) (For companies with employees)

Annual ROC Filings

Every year, private limited companies in India must file their annual accounts and returns with the Registrar of Companies (ROC). These documents disclose important details about the company, including its shareholders and directors.

Here’s a breakdown of the key forms involved:

  • Form MGT-7 (Annual Return): This form details information about the company’s shareholders, directors, and other relevant details. It needs to be filed within 60 days of holding the annual general meeting (AGM).
  • Form AOC-4 (Financial Statements): This form includes the company’s balance sheet, profit and loss account, and a director’s report. It needs to be filed with the ROC within 30 days of the AGM.

Annual General Meeting (AGM)

Private limited companies are required to hold an AGM at least once a year, within six months of the financial year’s closing. This meeting provides a platform for shareholders to:

  • Approve financial statements: Shareholders vote on the company’s financial performance as presented in the annual accounts.
  • Declare dividends: Dividends are a portion of the company’s profits distributed to shareholders. The AGM allows shareholders to vote on whether or not to declare dividends.
  • Appoint or reappoint auditors: Independent auditors review the company’s financial statements and provide an objective opinion. The AGM allows shareholders to vote on the appointment or reappointment of auditors.
  • Approve director compensation: Shareholders vote on the remuneration package for the company’s directors.

By law, the AGM must be held during business hours on a non-public holiday, either at the company’s registered office or within the city, town, or village where the office is located.

Board Meetings

Every private limited company must hold its first board meeting within 30 days of incorporation. Subsequently, board meetings should be held at least four times a year, with a gap of no more than three months between each meeting.

A minimum of two directors, or one-third of the total number of directors (whichever is higher), must be present at each board meeting. Discussions and decisions made during these meetings are documented in minutes, which are then stored for future reference at the company’s registered office.

Companies must also provide a seven-day notice to all directors regarding the date and purpose of each board meeting.

Event-Based Compliances for Private Limited Companies in India

In addition to annual filings, private limited companies in India must comply with various regulations triggered by specific events within the company. Here’s a breakdown of some key examples:

    • Changes in Capital: Any increase or decrease in the company’s authorized capital or paid-up capital requires specific filings with the Registrar of Companies (ROC).
    • Share Transactions: Issuing new shares, transferring existing shares, or any change in shareholding triggers compliance procedures.
    • Loans and Advances: Granting loans to other companies or directors necessitates filing specific forms with the ROC.
    • Directorial Changes: Appointment, resignation, or remuneration changes for managing directors or whole-time directors require timely filings.
    • Banking Activities: Opening a new bank account, closing an existing one, or modifying signatories on a bank account all have specific compliance procedures.
  • Creation, Modification or Satisfaction of Charges: Creation or modification or satisfaction of any charge on the property of the Company requires specific filings with the Registrar of Companies (ROC).
  • Auditors: Appointing new statutory auditors or any changes in the existing auditor team require adherence to regulations and filings with the ROC.

Documents required for Online Private Limited Company(PLC) Compliance

Here are some essential documents required for online Private Limited Company (PLC) compliance in India:

  • Director’s Identity and Address Proof: Passport or PAN Card copy for Indian Nationals and apostille/notarized Passport copy for Foreign Nationals (all self-attested)
  • Director’s DIN (Director Identification Number)
  • PAN Card of the Company
  • Subscription Details and Share Allotment Proof
  • Memorandum of Association (MOA)
  • Articles of Association (AOA)
  • Digital Signature Certificate (DSC) of Directors
  • Proof of Registered Office Address (Rent Agreement, No Objection Certificate from Landlord)
  • Form MGT-7 (Annual Return) (within 60 days of holding the AGM)
  • Form AOC-4 (Financial Statements) (within 30 days of holding the AGM) – includes Balance Sheet, Profit & Loss Account, and Director’s Report
  • Changes in shareholding or capital structure
  • Appointment or removal of directors or auditors
  • Loans or advances given to other companies or directors
  • Opening or closing of bank accounts or changes in signatories
  • Income Tax Return Documents (as per specific requirements)
  • TDS/TCS Return filing documents (if applicable)

FAQs: Private Limited Company (PLC) Compliance in India

  1. What are the annual filing requirements for a private limited company?
    Every year, PLCs need to file two main forms with the Registrar of Companies (ROC):
    Form MGT-7 (Annual Return): This details shareholder and director information within 60 days of the annual general meeting (AGM).
    Form AOC-4 (Financial Statements): This includes the company’s balance sheet, profit and loss account, and director’s report, filed within 30 days of the AGM.
  2. How often do I need to hold board meetings for my PLC?
    PLCs must hold their first board meeting within 30 days of incorporation. Subsequently, at least four board meetings are required each year, with a gap of no more than three months between each meeting.
  3. What happens if I miss a deadline for filing a compliance document?
    Missing deadlines for filings typically results in financial penalties imposed by the ROC. The penalty amount can vary depending on the specific form and the delay period.
  4. Do I need to appoint a company secretary for my PLC?
    Appointment of a company secretary is mandatory for PLCs with a paid-up capital of Rs. 10 crore or more (listed or public) and those exceeding Rs. 5 crore (unlisted private companies).
  5. What are some event-based compliances I need to be aware of?
    Besides annual filings, various other compliances are triggered by specific events within the company. These include changes in share capital, director appointments or resignations, loans granted, and bank account activities.
  6. What are the consequences of non-compliance for a Private Limited Company (PLC)?
    Failing to comply with regulations can lead to penalties, legal action, delayed approvals, reputational damage, difficulty raising capital, and even director disqualification in severe cases.
  7. How can I ensure my PLC maintains good compliance?
    Consulting with a professional like a company secretary or chartered accountant can help you stay updated on compliance requirements and deadlines. Additionally, online portals and government websites often provide valuable resources and information.
  8. What are the benefits of maintaining good compliance for my Private Limited Company?
    Compliance fosters smooth operations, enhances credibility, reduces penalty risks, improves corporate governance, and strengthens your company’s legal position. It also allows for better decision-making and can give you a competitive edge.
  9. Can I file my PLC compliance documents online?
    Yes, the Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) offers an online portal for filing various company forms and documents. This simplifies the process and reduces the need for physical submissions.
  10. Where can I find more information about PLC compliance requirements?
    The Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) website (https://www.mca.gov.in/content/mca/global/en/home.html) is a valuable resource for information on PLC compliance requirements, forms, and deadlines. Additionally, professional bodies and legal resources can provide further guidance.
Posted by
Treelife
Last updated on
May 07, 2024, 12:02pm

Disclaimer:

The content of this article is for information purpose only and does not constitute advice or a legal opinion and are personal views of the author. It is based upon relevant law and/or facts available at that point of time and prepared with due accuracy & reliability. Readers are requested to check and refer to relevant provisions of statute, latest judicial pronouncements, circulars, clarifications etc. before acting on the basis of the above write up. The possibility of other views on the subject matter cannot be ruled out. By the use of the said information, you agree that the Author / Treelife is not responsible or liable in any manner for the authenticity, accuracy, completeness, errors or any kind of omissions in this piece of information for any action taken thereof.

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